ANNOUNCER: The following
program is a production of   Pioneer Public Television.   [music]   NARRATOR: In this
episode of Postcards.   The next thing you
know, all I saw was water.   So we invaded at
southern France.   It’s really satisfying to
take these old instruments   and make something useful
and beautiful out of them   and, and fun.   I, I guess I try to be
artist as I want to,   as I, and I paint the
same things what I used to   paint back in Russia.   [Postcards theme music]   [Postcards theme music]   ANNOUNCER: This program on   Pioneer Public Television
is funded by the Minnesota   Arts and
Cultural Heritage Fund,   with money from the vote
of the people of Minnesota   on November fourth, 2008.   Additional support
provided by Mark and   Margaret-Yackel Juleen, in
honor of Shalom Hill Farm,   a non-profit, rural
education retreat center   in a beautiful prairie
setting near Windom in   southwestern Minnesota,
shalomhillfarm.org.   The Arrowwood Resort
and Conference Center.   Your ideal choice for
Minnesota resorts offering   luxury town homes,
18 holes of golf,   Darling Reflections
Spa, Big Splash Waterpark,   and much more.   Alexandria, Minnesota, a
relaxing vacation or great   location for an event.   Explorealex.com.   Easy to get to,
hard to leave.   NARRATOR: At the Fagen
Fighters World War II   Museum in
Granite Falls, U.S.   Army veteran Orice Larson
tells us his story of   serving in World War II.   [music]   I was actually started out as a
supply sergeant.   But then some corporal
needed some men and I was   just a serial number.   So I went to the infantry
and picked to go out on   cadre to train another
division and of course I   did that and the next
thing you know all I saw   was water and then I
saw the signals up in the   Straits of Gibraltar
way up so we invaded at   southern France.   I got some of Hitler’s
private stationary,   yeah, and captured the
biggest SS officer oh   someplace up in
the Alsace mountains there.   We went looking for a
plane we shot down and   stumbled upon a cabin if
you please or a house up   in the mountains.   And when we were
looting it if you please,   looking for stuff, jewelry
and all kinds of things,   I see a
picture of this S.S.   officer in the photo
albums that they had   there, these people.   And it had snowed; I could
see tracks leading out of   there.   So then of course I
told Harry Olson,   one of my men, I
said you cover me.   I see his tracks led out
and he ducked his luger   his pistol, oh
underneath the building,   and of course I retrieved
that and then I took off   and you know over there
like in Norway and the   other place, they have
the house they live in,   the courtyard, and the hay
and the store or whatever.   I could see his tracks
going up that way so I   told him, [Speaking
German] “Come on out with   your hands up.”   Nothing
happened so I, I said,   [Speaking German]
and I fired two,   three rounds up high, I
didn’t want to kill him.   And then he came out.   So of course they took
him up to prisoner of war,   had him standing by
a fence with guards,   guns pointing on him.   The line companies,
they’re the ones that had   the brunt of the battle
but we used to see the   bombers you know flying
and thank God that they   were ours you know.   And we saw fighter
planes escorting them,   but they were way up high.   So the Luftwaffe was
extinct you know at that   time so you know we
didn’t see any dog fights,   I didn’t anyway or
anything like that so.   And liberated I think it   was Buchenwald prison camp.   We came in, there was a
train standing there,   cars, and it had bodies
you know just   stacked up in ’em.   Many of em, men,
women, thrown in there,   they were so skinny it
was just skin and bones.   And then of course
when we came in,   they tried to climb the
electric fence and there   was a ball of fire.   They’d fall down in the
moat and we saw you know   three and four in a group
and we’d throw em some   cheese and bacon that came
in our ration you know   because they would always
fight themselves amongst   them to get a taste
of something to eat.   [music]   I was in Patton’s seventh army,   just started out, but then
they switched us over to   Patton’s third army so we
fought with him and all   the way down into
Brenner pass in Italy again.   [music]   I only want to say
that I didn’t think I ever   was that important.   You know you help, you’re
supposed to help your   fellow man and I
guess that’s kind of what   happened.   [music]   NARRATOR: Do you have
an idea for the   Postcards team?   Email us.   [email protected]   NARRATOR: Mark Freitas
gives us a lesson in   repurposed art,
demonstrating how one   man’s trash is
another man’s treasure.   [music]   My name is Mark
Freitas and I’m a musician.   I make instruments into
lamps and   other furniture items.   I started doing this when
I was in college and I was   working at another music
store and so a few months   ago we decided to start
kind of expanding what I   had done in the past and
so we’ve started here with   my job at Whitney Music,
gives me access to a lot   of older instruments,
these are instruments that   were just beat up and
basically we just had   around here for parts
and so I’m able to repair   those a little bit and
then you know make them   into a lamp or
other items.   [music]   When I start to make a lamp,   I like to do some research
about the instrument,   find out when it was
made or who it may have   belonged to.   If a person brings one to
me then I definitely want   to hear the back story and
sometimes again it’s been   their own instrument or
maybe it had been passed   down through generations
in their family,   so that makes it
very meaningful.   So once I determine you
know how old it is and   what kind of level
of instrument it was,   if it was a student level
or a professional level or   something like that, that
kind of guides me in you   know how I want to design
the rest of the piece   around it.   This is a 1910 melaphone.   It looks kind of like a
French horn but it’s a   little bit
different, little simpler,   kind of relative of
the French horn but this   beautiful silver that has
some beautiful engraving   on it there.   [music]   Now I’m wiring
the, the socket here,   cause see how I already
made this little thing   here to, for it to sit in
and just getting it all   wired up and then we
can put the bulb in it,   put the shade on it.   [music]   One of the things that I
really like doing about   the, with these
instruments too is that I   make each lamp
unique cause when I was   researching online there
are some companies that   make lamps and they kind
of make em all look alike   and I don’t like that.   I like to sort of go with
the personality of each   lamp or for a custom, what
a customer’s décor might   be and just make   each one unique, so.   This one didn’t have
this part right here.   Melaphones are usually
pitched in a couple of   different keys, they’ll
have like an extra tuning   slide or what they call a
tuning bit right here so   that they can be
pitched in F or E flat or   different things.   Well this one didn’t have
all that and it didn’t   even have a mouthpiece
and all that stuff and I   actually made this part,
which is typical of what a   horn like this would have,
and I put the mouthpiece   on it so this much, this
section right here I made   from scratch and silver
plated to try to make it   all blend in here and so
that took a lot of work.   And then just shining this
thing up too it was just   black with tarnish and so
it took a lot of effort to   get it looking
this and I didn’t,   I didn’t try to get every
bit of tarnish off of it   because I spent a lot of
time just getting it to   this point.   But then I lacquered it
so that’ll stay shiny like   this now.   [music]   I really love working
on antique and vintage   instruments and the
craftsmanship back then,   everything was done by
hand and a lot of the   instruments
have beautiful,   ornate engraving on them
and things like that which   you don’t find on
instruments today.   And so that I think really
adds to the beauty and the   value of the instrument
and then I think that   again helps me
to decide okay,   well I want to give this
one a special treatment.   I want to make it look
you know maybe from that   period with the type of
shade that I use on a lamp   or the type of
base that I make,   I want it to all fit so
that it really looks like   a period piece.   Well a lot of the
instruments that we get   come from either
customers or from schools,   and they’ll bring em in
and they’ll just be passed   the point of being
repaired you know.   So they’ll just
donate them to us or,   or we’ll give them a
little bit of credit for   the instrument, and then
it just gets put back here   somewhere in the store and
we will use it for parts.   And so that’s one way of
repurposing but then I got   the idea of taking
these instruments and then   making them into lamps
and other things and Bob   Whitney was really happy
to give me those to help   unclutter back
here in the shop.   And then we even have
people giving me pianos   because now instead of
taking a piano that’s not   worth fixing, you know
taking it to the dump or   something can be a
beautiful piece of art and   a functional piece.   It’s really satisfying to
take these old instruments   and make something useful
and beautiful out of them   and fun.   Some of my lamps are sort
of whimsical looking and   others are very classy and
chic looking and others   are somewhere in between.   So it’s neat to take an
instrument that maybe has   just been sitting
around for decades,   just gathering dust,
and then make something   beautiful out of it.   NARRATOR: Do
you use Facebook,   Twitter, or
other social media?   Connect with us to get
immediate access to behind   the scenes videos,
previews and other   Postcards and
Pioneer news.   NARRATOR: Katia Andreeva,
a long time resident of   Granite Falls, shows
us her unique style of   painting at the
Russian American Museum in   Minneapolis.   I came to America exactly
20 years ago in 1994 and   it was June and so I came,
I guess I tried to be   artist as I wanted, as
I, and I paint the same   things what I used to
paint back in Russia.   [music]   People, the
flowers, the eggs.   [music]   And eggs with Russian
stories. Different   seasons and it
was quite popular,   was surprisingly
interesting for American   and for Minnesotans.   And so it was great
start for me I guess.   [music]   I came here to
America and I guess   illustration was
become a big thing for me.   And about 15 years ago
I met John Peterson and   David Koechell.   They offer to do
the book with them,   and it was my
first book in 1999.   We did a book called
“Meet me in the Garden,   they saw some of
my art in the arts,   Edina art fair.   I had the pleasure of
meeting Katia in 1999,   and it was during
the Edina art fair.   Now I had been playing the
good husband role of going   all over the art
fair with my wife,   and then all
at once I said,   “Hey, let’s
walk over here.”   And then my wife and I
saw the most exquisite art   that day that we had seen.   And then I had the
pleasure of meeting Katia   and buying several
of her paintings,   and over the years
have become an avid   Katia Andreeva collector.   So that’s how
that happened.   We’ve done 30
books with Katia,   Katia’s art, and one of
the favorites is “Secrets   of the Vine,” but my,
my favorites are the   children’s books.   I mean those are the ones
that I think there’s a   vibrancy to the art and I
particularly like to see   the expressions on my
nieces and nephews when   they’re
looking at the art.   Makes my day.   Since I’m at
the publishers,   it’s kind of become
clear that something very   interesting for me to
do illustrations for the   books, all
different kinds.   Inspirational,
florals, children’s books.   So right now the
literature and poetry   inspired my art a lot
and it’s something very   interesting because I have
my personal interpretation   of the correctors and
using different techniques   it’s used to be only
watercolors in the past   and now I’m
using mixed media.   I am adding some pastels
and pencils and special   printing collages and
all kinds of things,   it’s getting more fun and
I’m thinking I’m getting   even, I’m bringing more
people with my art to me.   Those who are admire
you know not just the   beautiful picture, but
also some story behind it,   and my personal view.   So there’s connection.   Well I think that
there’s a very strong,   there’s a vibrancy of
emotion that comes through   in the color that, that
really makes the art.   For instance with
her children’s art,   it’s just a, it makes you
smile   just to look at the art.   So there’s that strong,
emotional appeal to it,   a feel good emotion.   That’s what I
like about it.   Watercolor have a life
itself and I guess the   fact that I don’t have
to control it too much,   kind of like I have a
little conversation   because watercolor is
interesting technique.   Depends on how much
water and pigment of,   in your
brushstrokes you applied.   The effect could be
absolutely different.   That’s why I say I don’t
really plan exactly my   images what I’m
going to paint.   They happen.   Sometimes I just sit in
front of the white piece   of paper and it could
admire me by itself,   you just have to be quiet
and look at that and start   mixing paint and it just
all starts living and you,   you can, you can
see things happening.   You just have to I
guess play the same game.   [music]   You know process of creativity;   it’s for those who
know how lifting it is.   That’s probably
most exciting thing.   I think we all know
that little bit right?   Your job, the creativity
that come up with a story   and how to put it
together right.   So it’s kind of
means the same thing,   creation you know you
doing something that   nobody done before, right?   [music]   [music]   ś “Walking down the street of
my little town, ś   ś all those old, old
buildings they just a ś   ś little run down. ś   ś Hotels and railroads,
they’re mostly gone to ś   ś dust, I wonder is it
true bout the rest of us. ś   ś All of my people you know,
they’re outside of town, ś   ś underneath those Norway ś   ś pines in that
immigrant ground. ś   ś I go out there sometimes
and I read the names I ś   ś wonder did they
look like me, ś   ś did they feel the same
about my little town, ś   ś my little town. ś   ś I guess I didn’t fall
too far from the nest, ś   ś that white spot in the
king of trails little bit ś   ś east or west, oh
that’s my little town, ś   ś my little town. ś   ś I sure miss the feeling,
sliding down ś   ś Mrs. Myer’s hill. ś   ś Didn’t like it all that
much but that was part of ś   ś the thrill. ś   ś Momma didn’t
like it either, ś   ś in fact the word
she used was ‘no’, ś   ś got the scars to prove I
flew all those years ago. ś   ś Just across from
great-grandpa’s house, ś   ś up on St. Olaf Street,
little Norwegian Lutheran ś   ś church, and
vesper bells so sweet, ś   ś you could feel those
ancient rhythms ‘fore the ś   ś day they looted tone, they
let every wayward child ś   ś know, time to go
back home in my, ś   ś my little town. ś   ś I guess I didn’t fall
too far from the nest, ś   ś white spot in the king of
trails little bit ś   ś east or west. ś   ś That’s my little
town, my little town. ś   ś That’s my little town.” ś   [music]   [music]   ś “I’m going
back down to Baltimore, ś   ś shoes and stockings
down on the floor. ś   ś Come on gal come
along with me, ś   ś going to take you
down to Tennessee. ś   ś When I woke okay dokey
told me soda cracker does ś   ś your momma, does
she chew tobacco? ś   ś Now okey dokey tell me
soda cracker does your ś   ś momma, does she
chew tobacco? ś   ś Well now do you hear that
old midnight train rolling ś   ś down through that
old thought of rain? ś   ś Ride that train
baby day and night, ś   ś in your arms girl
I feel alright. ś   ś Well now this old
world’s a lonesome place, ś   ś I can see it
on every face. ś   ś As I rambled
and as I rolled, ś   ś in your arms now
I feel at home. ś   ś It’s a green oh
green rocky road, ś   ś promenading
around old green. ś   ś Who do you love
girl who do you love? ś   ś Who do you love? ś   ś Now who do you love
girl who do you love? ś   ś Who do you love
girl who do you love? ś   ś Who do you love
girl who do you love? ś   [music]   NARRATOR: Visit
pioneer.org for more   information on Postcards
and other Pioneer   productions.   Pioneer on demand has
all of your favorite   productions available
to watch online at your   convenience,
including past episodes of   Postcards.   ANNOUNCER: This program on   Pioneer Public Television
is funded by the Minnesota   Arts and
Cultural Heritage Fund,   with money from the vote
of the people of Minnesota   on November fourth, 2008.   Additional support
provided by Mark and   Margaret-Yackel Juleen, in
honor of Shalom Hill Farm,   a non-profit, rural
education retreat center   in a beautiful prairie
setting near Windom in   southwestern Minnesota,
shalomhillfarm.org.   The Arrowwood Resort
and Conference Center.   Your ideal choice for
Minnesota resorts offering   luxury town homes,
18 holes of golf,   Darling Reflections
Spa, Big Splash Waterpark,   and much more.   Alexandria, Minnesota, a
relaxing vacation or great   location for an event.   Explorealex.com.   Easy to get to,
hard to leave.   [Postcards theme music]   Captioned by Pioneer
Public Television 2014
[Postcards theme music]